Commit fd0fb57e authored by Albert Gräf's avatar Albert Gräf
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Use a (freely available) sans serif font for the pdf output, easier to read on computer displays.

parent fe6565ae
...@@ -59,19 +59,19 @@ Permanent link: <a href="https://agraef.github.io/purr-data-intro/" class="uri"> ...@@ -59,19 +59,19 @@ Permanent link: <a href="https://agraef.github.io/purr-data-intro/" class="uri">
<p>When you launch Purr Data for the first time, most likely you will have to configure some things, such as the audio and MIDI devices that you want to use. Like Pd-l2ork, Purr Data provides a central “Preferences” dialog which lets you do this in a convenient way.</p> <p>When you launch Purr Data for the first time, most likely you will have to configure some things, such as the audio and MIDI devices that you want to use. Like Pd-l2ork, Purr Data provides a central “Preferences” dialog which lets you do this in a convenient way.</p>
<h3 id="audio-and-midi-devices">Audio and MIDI Devices</h3> <h3 id="audio-and-midi-devices">Audio and MIDI Devices</h3>
<p>The screenshot in fig. 2 shows how the “Audio” and “MIDI” tabs in this dialog look like on the Mac. For most purposes it should be sufficient to just select the audio and MIDI inputs and outputs that you want to use from the corresponding dropdown lists. Pressing the <code>Apply</code> button applies the settings <em>without</em> closing the dialog or saving the options permanently. If you want to make your changes permanent, you must use the <code>Ok</code> button instead. This also closes the dialog.</p> <p>The screenshot in fig. 2 shows how the “Audio” and “MIDI” tabs in this dialog look like on the Mac. For most purposes it should be sufficient to just select the audio and MIDI inputs and outputs that you want to use from the corresponding dropdown lists. Pressing the <code>Apply</code> button applies the settings <em>without</em> closing the dialog or saving the options permanently. If you want to make your changes permanent, you must use the <code>Ok</code> button instead. This also closes the dialog.</p>
<p>You can redo this procedure at any time if needed. Note that it is usually possible to select multiple input and output devices, but this depends on the platform and the selected audio/MIDI back-end or “API”. Also note that on Linux (using the ALSA API), the MIDI tab will only allow you to set the number of ALSA MIDI input/output ports to be created; you then still have to use a MIDI patchbay program such as <a href="https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io/">qjackctl</a> to connect these ports to the hardware devices as needed.</p>
<div class="figure"> <div class="figure">
<img src="prefs-audio+midi.png" alt="Figure 2: Audio and MIDI setup." id="fig:fig2" style="width:100.0%" /> <img src="prefs-audio+midi.png" alt="Figure 2: Audio and MIDI setup." id="fig:fig2" style="width:100.0%" />
<p class="caption">Figure 2: Audio and MIDI setup.</p> <p class="caption">Figure 2: Audio and MIDI setup.</p>
</div> </div>
<p>You can redo this procedure at any time if needed. Note that it is usually possible to select multiple input and output devices, but this depends on the platform and the selected audio/MIDI back-end or “API”. Also note that on Linux (using the ALSA API), the MIDI tab will only allow you to set the number of ALSA MIDI input/output ports to be created; you then still have to use a MIDI patchbay program such as <a href="https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io/">qjackctl</a> to connect these ports to the hardware devices as needed.</p>
<p>One pitfall of the Pd engine is that it does not rescan the devices if you connect new external audio or MIDI gear while Purr Data is already running. Thus you need to relaunch the program to make the new devices show up in the preferences. In the case of MIDI, it is easy to work around this limitation by employing virtual MIDI devices, which ALSA MIDI does by default. On the Mac you’d use the <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/mfalab/mac-stuff/how-to-use-the-iac-driver">IAC</a> devices, on Windows a MIDI loopback driver such as <a href="http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/software/loopmidi.html">loopMIDI</a> for that purpose. You then wire these up to the MIDI hardware using a separate patchbay program. A similar approach is possible with audio loopback software such as <a href="http://www.jackaudio.org/">Jack</a>.</p> <p>One pitfall of the Pd engine is that it does not rescan the devices if you connect new external audio or MIDI gear while Purr Data is already running. Thus you need to relaunch the program to make the new devices show up in the preferences. In the case of MIDI, it is easy to work around this limitation by employing virtual MIDI devices, which ALSA MIDI does by default. On the Mac you’d use the <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/mfalab/mac-stuff/how-to-use-the-iac-driver">IAC</a> devices, on Windows a MIDI loopback driver such as <a href="http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/software/loopmidi.html">loopMIDI</a> for that purpose. You then wire these up to the MIDI hardware using a separate patchbay program. A similar approach is possible with audio loopback software such as <a href="http://www.jackaudio.org/">Jack</a>.</p>
<h3 id="gui-and-startup-options">GUI and Startup Options</h3> <h3 id="gui-and-startup-options">GUI and Startup Options</h3>
<p>The GUI theme can be selected on the “GUI” tab (see fig. 3, left). The changes will be applied immediately. Purr Data provides various different GUI themes out of the box. Note that the GUI themes are in fact just CSS files in Purr Data’s library directory, so if you’re familiar with HTML5 and CSS then you can easily change them or create your own. Another useful option on the GUI tab is “save/load zoom level with patch”. Purr Data can zoom any patch window to 16 different levels, and this option, when enabled, allows you to store the current zoom level when a patch is saved, and then later restore the zoom level when the patch gets reloaded.</p> <p>The GUI theme can be selected on the “GUI” tab (see fig. 3, left). The changes will be applied immediately. Purr Data provides various different GUI themes out of the box. Note that the GUI themes are in fact just CSS files in Purr Data’s library directory, so if you’re familiar with HTML5 and CSS then you can easily change them or create your own. Another useful option on the GUI tab is “save/load zoom level with patch”. Purr Data can zoom any patch window to 16 different levels, and this option, when enabled, allows you to store the current zoom level when a patch is saved, and then later restore the zoom level when the patch gets reloaded.</p>
<p>The final tab in the preferences dialog is the “Startup” tab (fig. 3, right), which lets you edit the lists of library paths and startup libraries, as well as the additional options the program is to be invoked with. By default, Purr Data loads most bundled external libraries at startup and adds the corresponding directories to its library search path. If you don’t need all of these, you can remove individual search paths and/or libraries using the “Search Paths” and “Libraries” lists on the Startup tab. Just click on a search path or library and click the <code>Delete</code> button. It is also possible to select an item and add your own search paths and external libraries with the <code>New</code> button, or change an existing entry with the <code>Edit</code> button.</p>
<div class="figure"> <div class="figure">
<img src="prefs-gui+startup.png" alt="Figure 3: GUI and Startup options." id="fig:fig3" style="width:100.0%" /> <img src="prefs-gui+startup.png" alt="Figure 3: GUI and Startup options." id="fig:fig3" style="width:100.0%" />
<p class="caption">Figure 3: GUI and Startup options.</p> <p class="caption">Figure 3: GUI and Startup options.</p>
</div> </div>
<p>The final tab in the preferences dialog is the “Startup” tab (fig. 3, right), which lets you edit the lists of library paths and startup libraries, as well as the additional options the program is to be invoked with. By default, Purr Data loads most bundled external libraries at startup and adds the corresponding directories to its library search path. If you don’t need all of these, you can remove individual search paths and/or libraries using the “Search Paths” and “Libraries” lists on the Startup tab. Just click on a search path or library and click the <code>Delete</code> button. It is also possible to select an item and add your own search paths and external libraries with the <code>New</code> button, or change an existing entry with the <code>Edit</code> button.</p>
<p>At the bottom of the Startup tab there is a “Startup Flags” field which lets you specify which additional options the program should be invoked with. This is commonly used to add options like <code>-legacy</code> (which enforces bug compatibility with vanilla Pd) as well as the <code>-path</code> and <code>-lib</code> options which provide an alternative way to add search paths and external libraries. For instance, to add JGU’s Pure and Faust extensions to the startup libraries, the Startup Flags field may contain something like the following: <code>-lib pure -lib faust/pdfaust</code></p> <p>At the bottom of the Startup tab there is a “Startup Flags” field which lets you specify which additional options the program should be invoked with. This is commonly used to add options like <code>-legacy</code> (which enforces bug compatibility with vanilla Pd) as well as the <code>-path</code> and <code>-lib</code> options which provide an alternative way to add search paths and external libraries. For instance, to add JGU’s Pure and Faust extensions to the startup libraries, the Startup Flags field may contain something like the following: <code>-lib pure -lib faust/pdfaust</code></p>
<p>Any desired startup options can be set that way, i.e., anything that Pd usually accepts on the command line. However, note that the startup flags require that you relaunch Purr Data for the options to take effect (the same is true if you change the list of startup libraries). Also, while setting paths and libraries via the startup flags is often convenient, there are some downsides to having these options in two different places, see <a href="#sticky-preferences">“Sticky” preferences</a> in the <a href="#tips-and-tricks">Tips and Tricks</a> section below.</p> <p>Any desired startup options can be set that way, i.e., anything that Pd usually accepts on the command line. However, note that the startup flags require that you relaunch Purr Data for the options to take effect (the same is true if you change the list of startup libraries). Also, while setting paths and libraries via the startup flags is often convenient, there are some downsides to having these options in two different places, see <a href="#sticky-preferences">“Sticky” preferences</a> in the <a href="#tips-and-tricks">Tips and Tricks</a> section below.</p>
<p>As with the other configuration options, remember to press the <code>Ok</code> button in order to have your changes recorded in permanent storage. This will also close the dialog.</p> <p>As with the other configuration options, remember to press the <code>Ok</code> button in order to have your changes recorded in permanent storage. This will also close the dialog.</p>
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...@@ -82,20 +82,20 @@ When you launch Purr Data for the first time, most likely you will have to confi ...@@ -82,20 +82,20 @@ When you launch Purr Data for the first time, most likely you will have to confi
The screenshot in [@fig:fig2] shows how the "Audio" and "MIDI" tabs in this dialog look like on the Mac. For most purposes it should be sufficient to just select the audio and MIDI inputs and outputs that you want to use from the corresponding dropdown lists. Pressing the `Apply` button applies the settings *without* closing the dialog or saving the options permanently. If you want to make your changes permanent, you must use the `Ok` button instead. This also closes the dialog. The screenshot in [@fig:fig2] shows how the "Audio" and "MIDI" tabs in this dialog look like on the Mac. For most purposes it should be sufficient to just select the audio and MIDI inputs and outputs that you want to use from the corresponding dropdown lists. Pressing the `Apply` button applies the settings *without* closing the dialog or saving the options permanently. If you want to make your changes permanent, you must use the `Ok` button instead. This also closes the dialog.
![Audio and MIDI setup.](prefs-audio+midi.png){#fig:fig2 width=100%}
You can redo this procedure at any time if needed. Note that it is usually possible to select multiple input and output devices, but this depends on the platform and the selected audio/MIDI back-end or "API". Also note that on Linux (using the ALSA API), the MIDI tab will only allow you to set the number of ALSA MIDI input/output ports to be created; you then still have to use a MIDI patchbay program such as [qjackctl](https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io/) to connect these ports to the hardware devices as needed. You can redo this procedure at any time if needed. Note that it is usually possible to select multiple input and output devices, but this depends on the platform and the selected audio/MIDI back-end or "API". Also note that on Linux (using the ALSA API), the MIDI tab will only allow you to set the number of ALSA MIDI input/output ports to be created; you then still have to use a MIDI patchbay program such as [qjackctl](https://qjackctl.sourceforge.io/) to connect these ports to the hardware devices as needed.
![Audio and MIDI setup.](prefs-audio+midi.png){#fig:fig2 width=100%}
One pitfall of the Pd engine is that it does not rescan the devices if you connect new external audio or MIDI gear while Purr Data is already running. Thus you need to relaunch the program to make the new devices show up in the preferences. In the case of MIDI, it is easy to work around this limitation by employing virtual MIDI devices, which ALSA MIDI does by default. On the Mac you'd use the [IAC](https://sites.google.com/site/mfalab/mac-stuff/how-to-use-the-iac-driver) devices, on Windows a MIDI loopback driver such as [loopMIDI](http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/software/loopmidi.html) for that purpose. You then wire these up to the MIDI hardware using a separate patchbay program. A similar approach is possible with audio loopback software such as [Jack](http://www.jackaudio.org/). One pitfall of the Pd engine is that it does not rescan the devices if you connect new external audio or MIDI gear while Purr Data is already running. Thus you need to relaunch the program to make the new devices show up in the preferences. In the case of MIDI, it is easy to work around this limitation by employing virtual MIDI devices, which ALSA MIDI does by default. On the Mac you'd use the [IAC](https://sites.google.com/site/mfalab/mac-stuff/how-to-use-the-iac-driver) devices, on Windows a MIDI loopback driver such as [loopMIDI](http://www.tobias-erichsen.de/software/loopmidi.html) for that purpose. You then wire these up to the MIDI hardware using a separate patchbay program. A similar approach is possible with audio loopback software such as [Jack](http://www.jackaudio.org/).
### GUI and Startup Options ### GUI and Startup Options
The GUI theme can be selected on the "GUI" tab (see [@fig:fig3], left). The changes will be applied immediately. Purr Data provides various different GUI themes out of the box. Note that the GUI themes are in fact just CSS files in Purr Data's library directory, so if you're familiar with HTML5 and CSS then you can easily change them or create your own. Another useful option on the GUI tab is "save/load zoom level with patch". Purr Data can zoom any patch window to 16 different levels, and this option, when enabled, allows you to store the current zoom level when a patch is saved, and then later restore the zoom level when the patch gets reloaded. The GUI theme can be selected on the "GUI" tab (see [@fig:fig3], left). The changes will be applied immediately. Purr Data provides various different GUI themes out of the box. Note that the GUI themes are in fact just CSS files in Purr Data's library directory, so if you're familiar with HTML5 and CSS then you can easily change them or create your own. Another useful option on the GUI tab is "save/load zoom level with patch". Purr Data can zoom any patch window to 16 different levels, and this option, when enabled, allows you to store the current zoom level when a patch is saved, and then later restore the zoom level when the patch gets reloaded.
![GUI and Startup options.](prefs-gui+startup.png){#fig:fig3 width=100%}
The final tab in the preferences dialog is the "Startup" tab ([@fig:fig3], right), which lets you edit the lists of library paths and startup libraries, as well as the additional options the program is to be invoked with. By default, Purr Data loads most bundled external libraries at startup and adds the corresponding directories to its library search path. If you don't need all of these, you can remove individual search paths and/or libraries using the "Search Paths" and "Libraries" lists on the Startup tab. Just click on a search path or library and click the `Delete` button. It is also possible to select an item and add your own search paths and external libraries with the `New` button, or change an existing entry with the `Edit` button. The final tab in the preferences dialog is the "Startup" tab ([@fig:fig3], right), which lets you edit the lists of library paths and startup libraries, as well as the additional options the program is to be invoked with. By default, Purr Data loads most bundled external libraries at startup and adds the corresponding directories to its library search path. If you don't need all of these, you can remove individual search paths and/or libraries using the "Search Paths" and "Libraries" lists on the Startup tab. Just click on a search path or library and click the `Delete` button. It is also possible to select an item and add your own search paths and external libraries with the `New` button, or change an existing entry with the `Edit` button.
![GUI and Startup options.](prefs-gui+startup.png){#fig:fig3 width=100%}
At the bottom of the Startup tab there is a "Startup Flags" field which lets you specify which additional options the program should be invoked with. This is commonly used to add options like `-legacy` (which enforces bug compatibility with vanilla Pd) as well as the `-path` and `-lib` options which provide an alternative way to add search paths and external libraries. For instance, to add JGU's Pure and Faust extensions to the startup libraries, the Startup Flags field may contain something like the following: `-lib pure -lib faust/pdfaust` At the bottom of the Startup tab there is a "Startup Flags" field which lets you specify which additional options the program should be invoked with. This is commonly used to add options like `-legacy` (which enforces bug compatibility with vanilla Pd) as well as the `-path` and `-lib` options which provide an alternative way to add search paths and external libraries. For instance, to add JGU's Pure and Faust extensions to the startup libraries, the Startup Flags field may contain something like the following: `-lib pure -lib faust/pdfaust`
Any desired startup options can be set that way, i.e., anything that Pd usually accepts on the command line. However, note that the startup flags require that you relaunch Purr Data for the options to take effect (the same is true if you change the list of startup libraries). Also, while setting paths and libraries via the startup flags is often convenient, there are some downsides to having these options in two different places, see ["Sticky" preferences] in the [Tips and Tricks] section below. Any desired startup options can be set that way, i.e., anything that Pd usually accepts on the command line. However, note that the startup flags require that you relaunch Purr Data for the options to take effect (the same is true if you change the list of startup libraries). Also, while setting paths and libraries via the startup flags is often convenient, there are some downsides to having these options in two different places, see ["Sticky" preferences] in the [Tips and Tricks] section below.
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...@@ -145,12 +145,12 @@ $endfor$ ...@@ -145,12 +145,12 @@ $endfor$
\usepackage{mathpazo} \usepackage{mathpazo}
\usepackage[scaled=0.86]{beramono} \usepackage[scaled=0.86]{beramono}
% AG: On my Linux system the Palatino font is actually called "Palatino % AG: Using "Liberation Sans" as the main font here, since it's free and a
% Linotype", so that's what we use here. You might have to edit this. % font without serifs is easier to read on the screen. Edit as needed.
\setromanfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Palatino Linotype} \setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Liberation Sans}
\setsansfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Palatino Linotype} \setsansfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Liberation Sans}
\setmonofont[Mapping=tex-text,Scale=0.8]{Bitstream Vera Sans Mono} \setmonofont[Mapping=tex-text]{Liberation Mono}
\providecommand{\tightlist}{% \providecommand{\tightlist}{%
\setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}\setlength{\parskip}{0pt}} \setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}\setlength{\parskip}{0pt}}
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